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Growing the Distance: Personal Implementation Guide

Growing the Distance: Personal Implementation Guide

The Personal Implementation Guide builds upon Growing the Distance and moves from inspiration to application. In this very practical handbook, Jim condenses and shares over twenty-five years of experience helping thousands of people apply the timeless leadership principles and practices.

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Growing the Distance: Timeless Principles for Personal, Career, and Family Success

Growing the Distance: Timeless Principles for Personal, Career, and Family Success

There are countless personal and leadership development books full of jargon, fads, and buzzwords flooding the market. A bestseller, this is a book of “profound simplicity” that cuts to the essence, while being easy and fun to read. Although highly applicable to readers of Jim’s previous bestselling books with roles and titles like manager, supervisor, or executive, Growing the Distance is written for a much broader audience.

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Thoughts That Make You Go Hmmm on…Mindfulness in the Age of Complexity

Ellen Jane Langer is a professor of psychology at Harvard University. Over the past 35 years she’s written eleven books and more than two hundred research articles on mindfulness, illusion of control, decision making, and aging. Her landmark book, Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility (click here to read my summary/review of it), […]

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Reality Check: Which Glasses Are You Wearing?

A reader sent me this e-mail: “Your recent blog, “A Dose of Reality: Our World is Dramatically Better“, is excellent. Your information supports what I had already believed but did not have data to support. As I was reading your blog, I happened to have on my desk a copy of the book “The Trouble […]

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Thoughts That Make You Go Hmm on… “One Simple Idea” by Mitch Horowitz

“For all its shortcomings, positive thinking has stood up with surprising muscularity in the present era of placebo studies, mind-body therapies, brain-biology research, and, most controversial, the findings of quantum physics experiments … may challenge how we come to view ourselves in the twenty-first century, at least as much as Darwinism challenged man’s self-perception in […]

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Review of “One Simple Idea: How Positive Thinking Reshaped Modern Life” by Mitch Horowitz

I couldn’t put down this deeply researched, well-written, and fascinating book. His one simple idea is “thoughts are causative.” Starting in the 1830s, Horowitz weaves together an entertaining and insightful history of “the most radical idea of our times.” As a long time student of self-help and personal growth literature and approaches I had many […]

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Thoughts That Make You Go Hmmm on… “Hardwiring Happiness” by Rick Hanson

“…what you pay attention to — what you rest your mind on — is the primary shaper of your brain.” “…the default setting of the brain is to overestimate threats, underestimate opportunities, and underestimate resources both for coping with threats and for fulfilling opportunities. Then we update these beliefs with information that confirms them, while […]

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Review of “Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence”

The emerging science of Positive Psychology continues its exponential growth using evidence-based approaches. New research and practical applications map pathways for moving our mental health and well-being from good to great. Rick Hanson is a neuropsychologist, founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, and an Affiliate of the Greater Good Science Center […]

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A Dose of Reality: Our World is Dramatically Better

Make a hopeful comment to a pessimist and he or she will often counter with “bringing you back to reality.” Most of what’s called “reality” are reflections from the dark side. Politicians, journalists, activists, and religious, environmental and other fundamentalists wallow in fear and dire warnings of impending doom. Here’s what evidence-based reality tells about […]

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Thoughts That Make You Go Hmmm on…A New Year

“We spend January 1st walking through our lives, room by room, drawing up a list of work to be done, cracks to be patched. Maybe this year, to balance the list, we ought to walk through the rooms of our lives…not looking for flaws, but for potential.” – Ellen Goodman, American journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning […]

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Optimistic Leaders are Four Times More Effective: 8 Steps to Get You There

Eleanor Roosevelt, American diplomat, writer, and U.S. First Lady once said, “In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves. The process never ends until we die. And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.” My book, Growing @ the Speed of Change, was built around the fundamental choices of […]

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Jest for the Pun of It

If you’re a father I hope you enjoyed Father’s Day and were treated like a king. I tried to get our three kids — although they’re now in the twenties and hardly kids anymore — to give me the gift of laughing at all my Dad Jokes all day long. But they would not groan […]

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Review of “The Happiness Advantage” by Shawn Achor

Up until the late nineties psychology was overly focused on the “sickness model” and treating mental illness. In The Happiness Advantage Shawn points out, “as late as 1998, there was a 17-to-1 negative-to-positive ratio of research in the field of psychology. In other words, for every one study about happiness and thriving there were 17 studies […]

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Change Choices: Creating Our Own Reality

The short video clip Lost Generation continues to be a big hit with keynote and workshop audiences as we discuss our choices to Lead, Follow, or Wallow when faced with challenging changes or setbacks. It features a poem written by Jonathon Reed for a “U @ 50” contest sponsored by the American Association of Retired […]

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Highlighting Bright Colors During Dark Times

My last post focused on our work with Aga Khan University; a remarkable example of a highly values and mission driven organization navigating through very turbulent times in difficult parts of the world. In my initial trip last June and my recent visit this May, I had some time to tour the teaming city of […]

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Building Our Resilience in Facing the F-Word

Failure. Is it temporary or permanent? Is it an experience or who you are? Do you learn from it or get crushed by it? Do you get traumatized, bounce back, or grow and become better off? The April issue of the Harvard Business Review is entitled “The Failure Issue: How to Understand It, Learn From […]

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Book Review of “Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility”

How old would you be if you didn’t know how old your body is? “You’re only as old as you feel” is folk wisdom that’s almost a cliche. In Counterclockwise, Harvard psychology professor, Ellen Langer, presents powerful evidence showing just how true that is. Langer’s life work is on illusion of control, aging, decision-making, and […]

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Thoughts That Make You Go Hmmm on….. The Destructive Power of Fear

Fear does have a place in our lives. The motivational power of fear can even be crucial to our survival. If we’re physically attacked, fear can jolt us with the adrenalin and motivation we need for fight or flight. Fear is like fire. It can be a life-giving energy source or it can badly burn […]

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St. Patrick’s Day: Driving Out the Snakes of Fear in Turbulent Times

Given the huge disaster in Japan, unrest in the Middle East, and shaky stock markets we especially need to nurture our “inner guru” (see my last post) to dispense the darkness of pessimism, fear, and worry. The positive energy and celebration of St. Patrick’s Day may be just the reminder we need. One of the […]

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“Barriers” Like Age Are Often Self-Created

A reader recently sent me a lengthy e-mail raising questions dealing with age and organizational culture. Here’s the essence of it: "My daughter is a youthful 29 years old (and short which doesn’t help!) working in the financial services industry. Over the past four years she has done very well with a few promotions. Her […]

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